Medieval Crime And Punishment Essays

Crime And Punishment In Medieval Europe

Lesson chosen:
The lesson is situated in the fourth week, and is the eleventh and second last lesson in the unit outline.
Lesson aims in relation to Content Focus:
The aim of this lesson will be to develop students understanding of crime and punishment in Medieval Europe. As outlined in AUSVELS, this will include investigating different kinds of crime and punishment utilised and the ways the nature of crime and punishment has either stayed the same throughout history, or changed over time.
Contributions of this Lesson:
This lesson is positioned after a study into Medieval Europe’s significant individuals. During the previous lesson, students were introduced to individuals such as Charlemagne, and were able to create a presentation, ad or speech either for or against that person. As a result of the previous lesson, students will be able to understand the significance war had on the memory of historical figures. The next lesson will be able to build upon this knowledge by continuing discussion about war, and the possible punishments for those who rebelled in any way. This initial discussion will be broadened by talking about general crime and punishment during the medieval period, asking questions in the discussion such as who, what, when, where and how. At the conclusion of this lesson, student will have developed a deeper understanding into the different forms of torture in medieval Europe, and how it compares to punishment in modern day Australia. In the following lesson, students will be continuing discussions about the comparison of medieval crimes and punishment to the evolution of the nature of justice. This will transition into developing students’ knowledge on the Australian legal system and origin of common and statutory law. Students will then learn about the purposes of laws and consider examples of the process of making and changing them. Additionally, they will be given a task to evaluate the merits and successes of the principles in Australia’s legal system such as justice, the presumption of innocence and equality before the law. Further, they will identify the mandatory conditions for a fair trial and conclude the lesson with a discussion about the comparison of the notion of which legal system students believe is more fair, either Medieval Europe or Australia today.
Justification of Pedagogies:
As a means of making students engage in a meaningful way, Inquiry-based pedagogy has been utilised to ensure students actively participate in the lesson. As stated by Godinho, Inquiry is a systematic, sequenced study, a dispositional way of thinking in a conversational way (Godinho 2013 p.237). Fundamentally inquiry-based pedagogy emphasizes procedure over content, theoretical understanding, student-2013 p.237). This approach of learning is a critical tool in the classroom as students need to know how to think critically when they enter their future professions rather than just knowing how to replicate information. If the lesson had...

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Below you will find three outstanding thesis statements / paper topics on Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky that can be used as essay starters. All five incorporate at least one of the themes found in the text and are broad enough so that it will be easy to find textual support, yet narrow enough to provide a focused clear thesis statement. These thesis statements offer a summary of different elements that could be important in an essay but you are free to add your own analysis and understanding of the plot or themes to them. Using the essay topics below in conjunction with the list of important quotes from Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, you should have no trouble connecting with the text and writing an excellent essay.

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #1 Alienation and Separation from Society in Crime and Punishment

The world presented in Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky is quite harsh and there are few examples of people who are either comfortable or provided for. Certainly this is the case with Raskolnikov (also called Rodya or Rodion) and his family. This desolate landscape and setting further emphasizes the theme of desolation, isolation, and alienation. For this essay you could take two directions. First, you could examine the setting itself and describes ways in which it is in itself alienating. For a longer essay, could incorporate ideas about the setting with the ways in which characters as alienated from society. Raskolnikov would be the best example and you could discuss how he is alienated because of his worldview and finds, in his own personal philosophy, that he is superior and others only exist to serve him in some way. There are other directions you could take the theme of alienation and these are but two examples.

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #2 The Role of God and Religion in Crime and Punishment

The function of religion and individual understandings of God is an important theme in the novel, particularly toward the end. Although Raskolnikov is far too arrogant throughout the majority of the novel to come to terms with religion or his conception of God, all around him there are a number of religious messages come at him from Sonia and others. The presence of religion offers readers a unique paradox because on the one hand, this novel is about an essentially godless person who commits an awful and grave sin. For this essay, examine the ways in which this might be a religious parable. Make connections between biblical characters (Cain and Abel, Mary Magdalene, etc) and if you want to be more complex, consider these issues in light of the context of Dostoevsky’s life and religious conversion.

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #3: The Rationalization of Crime / Character Analysis of Raskolnikov

Part of what makes Raskonikov such an enduring, compelling, and frightening character is the way he is able to coldly rationalize murder and evil. In his mind, when how the woman is “useful to anyone at all” he is suggesting that there are people who do not deserve to live and since his purposes are noble (he is not, after all, murdering her for the sheer joy of crime but in order to help his family and secure a good life for himself late) then his crime is justified. Although the guilt tears him apart, at no point does he ever seem to wonder about if what he did was right or wrong necessarily, but his guilt stems from a more complex set of reasons—not the least of which is the involvement of Sonia. For this essay, examine the many ways in which Raskolnikov is able to rationalize sin and close the essay with your insights on what this means. Code corrupted. Insert fresh copy.

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